Three Gospel Stories That Take Place After Easter

Three Gospel Stories That Take Place After Easter

Sometimes in our secular culture, it’s easy to forget that Easter is a season, not just a single day. While the world moves away from bunnies and eggs, we Catholics are called to remain in the joy of the Resurrection. One of the ways that we can do this, and help our children to do the same, is by reading stories from the Gospels that come after Easter Sunday.

How long is Easter really?

After rising from the dead, Jesus remained on earth with his disciples for 40 days. This is why the Easter season is 40 days long. It lasts from the Resurrection to the Ascension. The Gospels continue after Easter Sunday, and follow along with Jesus as He continued to teach, love, and prepare His disciples. These stories are often overlooked but are profoundly important to our Catholic Faith.

Here are three of my favorite stories that take place after Easter Sunday, and why they matter.

Celebrate St Patrick's Day the Catholic Way! Reading Three Gospel Stories That Take Place After Easter 5 minutes

By Colleen Pressprich

Sometimes in our secular culture, it’s easy to forget that Easter is a season, not just a single day. While the world moves away from bunnies and eggs, we Catholics are called to remain in the joy of the Resurrection. One of the ways that we can do this, and help our children to do the same, is by reading stories from the Gospels that come after Easter Sunday.

How long is Easter really?

After rising from the dead, Jesus remained on earth with his disciples for 40 days. This is why the Easter season is 40 days long. It lasts from the Resurrection to the Ascension. The Gospels continue after Easter Sunday, and follow along with Jesus as He continued to teach, love, and prepare His disciples. These stories are often overlooked but are profoundly important to our Catholic Faith.

Here are three of my favorite stories that take place after Easter Sunday, and why they matter.

The Road to Emmaus

Luke 24:13-33

In this Gospel story, Jesus meets and journeys with two of His disciples who were fleeing Jerusalem after His death. They don’t recognize Him at first, only later in the breaking of the bread.

Why this story is Important:

This Gospel story shows us and our kids that Jesus meets us where we are. He is willing to journey with us, even if we’re going the wrong direction. But, just as He did with these two disciples, He will challenge us along the way until our eyes are opened as theirs were.

Why kids like this story:

It’s not the only time that his happens in the Gospels, but here we see Jesus eating dinner with his disciples. A favorite priest of mine always remarks that he’s encouraged by this because it must mean that there’s food in Heaven for our resurrected bodies. While we can’t be certain of that, it does make my kids chuckle to think about and can spark some fun discussions.

The Power to Forgive Sins

John 20:19-23

Though only a few verses long, this Gospel passage is incredibly important because it is here, after His Resurrection that Jesus grants the apostles the power to forgive sins.

Why this Gospel is Important:

For Catholics, this Gospel is the origin story of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. It’s a great gift to us that Jesus passed this power on to His apostles (and thus our priests today). He knew that we would need the tangible, the touch-able of the Sacrament, in order to truly understand His forgiveness.

Why My Kids Need this Story:

Sometimes confession is scary for kids, but it shouldn’t be. This Gospel is a great launch pad for reminding our kids that in the confessional our priests stand in place of Christ, and that Jesus extended this grace for them out of love for us.

Peter and Jesus by the Fire

John 21:15-19

Here we see Jesus asking Peter three times if Peter loves Him and instructs him to tend the Lord’s sheep. Peter gets impatient at the repeated questions, but it’s clear that Jesus has a purpose.

Why this Gospel is Important:

This Gospel is the mirror of the Holy Thursday story where Peter denies Jesus three times. Here he is offered a second chance, and given a commission. Instead of a lecture, or an angry speech about the denial, Jesus responds with love and an opportunity. Peter is given the responsibility to take care of the people of God.

Why Parents Need this Story (or at least why I do):

How many times has God done just this for me? Responded with mercy instead of anger at my sins. And yet, do I follow His example?  When my kids make mistakes, it’s easy to be angry. This is a story that I try to remember when I’m faced with a child who needs a second chance.

I hope you and your family have a blessed Easter, and that you enjoy diving into these Gospel stories!

Colleen Pressprich is a homeschooling mom of five and the author of Marian Consecration for Families with Young Children, The Women Doctors of the Church, The Jesse Tree For Families, and God the Father’s Love: A Journey Through Scripture for Catholic Families. You can learn more about her, order her books, and read more of her writing at elevatortoheaven.com.

 

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